N. Korea says ballistic missile test successful

North Korea on Tuesday boasted its test of a precision-guided missile was "successful", saying it had zeroed in within a few metres of a target provocatively close to Japan the day before.

The North's leader Kim Jong-Un supervised the launch of the guided ballistic rocket -- the third missile test by the nuclear-armed regime in less than three weeks and carried out in defiance of US threats of military action and UN sanctions.

"The ballistic rocket flew toward the east sky where the day broke and correctly hit a planned target point with deviation of seven meters after flying over the middle shooting range," the state-run news agency KCNA said.

South Korea's military earlier said the Scud-type missile travelled eastward for 450 km (280 miles). Japan said it believed it had fallen into its exclusive economic zone, extending 200 nautical miles from the coast.

The missile test triggered swift condemnation from US President Donald Trump who said it showed "disrespect" to neighbouring China, the North's sole major ally, which has sought to dampen tensions over Pyongyang's weapons programme.

The launch was aimed at testing a weapon "capable of making ultra-precision strike on the enemies' objects at any area", KCNA said.

"Whenever news of our valuable victory is broadcast... the Yankees would be very much worried about it and the gangsters of the South Korean puppet army would be dispirited more and more," Kim was quoted as saying.

- Longest-range rocket yet -

The projectile was showcased for the first time last month as part of Pyongyang's annual military parade to mark the 105th birth anniversary of the regime's founder Kim Il-Sung, the news agency added.

Following North Korea's test-firing earlier this month of what analysts said was its longest-range rocket yet, the UN Security Council vowed to push all countries to tighten sanctions against Pyongyang.

But China has made it clear that the push for talks -- and not more sanctions -- is its priority. On Monday it pleaded again for dialogue.

"We hope that related parties can remain calm and restrained, ease the tension on the peninsula, and bring the peninsula issue onto the right track of peaceful dialogue again," the Chinese foreign ministry said.

The US has said it is willing to enter into talks only if the North halts its missile and nuclear tests.

Several rounds of UN sanctions have done little to stop the isolated regime from pushing ahead with its ambition to develop an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that can deliver a nuclear warhead to the continental US.

The impoverished nation has staged two atomic tests and test-fired dozens of rockets since the beginning of last year, including 12 launched this year.

A simultaneous launch of four missiles held on March 6 saw three falling provocatively close to Japan, sparking alarm in the neighbouring country.

Monday's test was the third since new South Korean president Moon Jae-In took office, posing a major challenge to Moon who advocated dialogue and reconciliation with Pyongyang in a break from his conservative predecessors.

Many analysts doubt if the North has developed an ICBM or a nuclear warhead small enough to fit atop a missile.

But most agree that the country has made a significant progress under the young leader, who took power after the death of his father and longtime ruler, Kim Jong-Il, in December 2011.

North Korea fires missile in latest provocation
Seoul (AFP) May 29, 2017 - North Korea test-fired a missile Monday which fell provocatively close to its neighbour Japan, the latest in a series of launches that have heightened tensions over Pyongyang's nuclear weapons ambitions.

It was the North's 12th ballistic missile test this year -- carried out in defiance of UN sanctions warnings and US threats of possible military action.

The launch went ahead despite tough talk from US President Donald Trump, who promised last week at the G7 summit that the "big problem" of North Korea "will be solved".

South Korea's military said the Scud-type missile travelled for 450 km (280 miles), and Japan said it was estimated to have fallen into its exclusive economic zone, extending 200 nautical miles from the coast.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe swiftly condemned the test -- the second time this year that a North Korean missile has fallen close to its shores -- vowing concerted action with the US.

"We will never tolerate North Korea's continued provocations that ignore repeated warnings by the international community," Abe told reporters.

"As agreed during the G7 summit, the North Korean problem is the international community's top priority."

- Conflict 'catastrophic' -

The North has been stepping up efforts towards its ultimate goal -- developing an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that can deliver a nuclear warhead to the continental US.

Despite Trump's strident warnings of possible military intervention, Secretary of Defense James Mattis said in an interview which aired Sunday before the launch that a war with North Korea would be "catastrophic".

"The North Korean regime has hundreds of artillery cannons and rocket launchers within range of one of the most densely populated cities on Earth, which is the capital of South Korea," he told CBS News.

"This regime is a threat to the region, to Japan, to South Korea. And in the event of war, they would bring danger to China and to Russia as well.

"But the bottom line is, it would be a catastrophic war if this turns into a combat, if we're not able to resolve this situation through diplomatic means."

Mattis declined to say what kind of action from Pyongyang would constitute a "red line" for Washington, saying the administration needs "political manoeuvre room."

The latest launch demonstrates the North's confidence and its determination to secure leverage in any future negotiations with the US, said Cho Han-Bum, analyst at the Korea Institute for National Unification.

"Today's launch is the North's way of saying to the world, 'It wouldn't be easy to make us suspend our weapons programmes even if you manage to pressure me into negotiations'."

- 'Direct challenge' -

South Korea's new president Moon Jae-In ordered a meeting of the national security council to assess the launch, which came a day after Pyongyang said leader Kim Jong-Un had overseen a test of a new anti-aircraft weapons system.

The South condemned the missile test as a "grave threat" and a challenge to Moon, who advocates dialogue with the North in a break from his conservative predecessors.

"That the North repeated such provocations after the inauguration of our new leadership... is a direct challenge to our demand for peace and denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula," the foreign ministry said.

Following North Korea's test-firing earlier this month of what analysts said was its longest-range rocket yet, the UN Security Council vowed to push all countries to tighten sanctions against Pyongyang.

But China, the North's main trade partner and ally, has made it clear that the push for talks -- and not more sanctions -- is the priority. On Monday it pleaded again for dialogue to calm regional tensions.

"We hope that related parties can remain calm and restrained, ease the tension on the peninsula, and bring the peninsula issue into the right track of peaceful dialogue again," the foreign ministry said.

The US has said it is willing to enter into talks only if the North halts its missile and nuclear tests.

NUKEWARS
North Korea fires missile in latest provocation
Seoul (AFP) May 29, 2017
North Korea test-fired a missile Monday into Japan's maritime economic zone - the latest in a series of provocative launches that have heightened tensions over its nuclear weapons ambitions. It was the North's third ballistic missile test in as many weeks and the 12th this year - carried out in defiance of UN sanctions warnings and US threats of possible military action. US military mo ... read more

Related Links
Learn about nuclear weapons doctrine and defense at SpaceWar.com
Learn about missile defense at SpaceWar.com
All about missiles at SpaceWar.com
Learn about the Superpowers of the 21st Century at SpaceWar.com

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once
credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly
paypal only

Let's block ads! (Why?)



from Military Space News, Nuclear Weapons, Missile Defense http://ift.tt/2qwG9dW
via space News
N. Korea says ballistic missile test successful N. Korea says ballistic missile test successful Reviewed by Defense Alert on 03:59:00 Rating: 5

No comments:

Defense Alert. Powered by Blogger.